Puppy Eruption!

I walk through what is normally recovery rooms for severe abuse cases after the dog had surgery and instead see one poor mama dog either giving birth or just gave birth after another. I am grateful the cycle stops here but wonder about all the other strays out there we couldn’t rescue. 

The costs for puppies at Stray Rescue is off the charts! Here are the stats: 100 average pups a month cost $42K every six months and that doesn't include the care for sick puppies. When you consider these numbers, and yes, this is where I ask you to help offset some of these costs and donate so we can continue our battle to stop the stray problem.

If you’re an advocate for spaying and neutering companion animals, I know you have experienced the debate from hell when you ask someone why they won’t step up and fix their pets. Well, I found some ammo that could help in your next debate. Let’s educate as a collective group and share the knowledge of change.  

A USA Today (May 7, 2013) article cites that pets who live in the states with the highest rates of spaying/neutering also live the longest. According to the report, neutered male dogs live 18% longer than un-neutered male dogs and spayed female dogs live 23% longer than unspayed female dogs. The report goes on to add that in Mississippi, the lowest-ranking state for pet longevity, 44% of the dogs are not neutered or spayed.

(Picture above is on the streets in a abandon warehouse)

Part of the reduced lifespan of unaltered pets can be attributed to their increased urge to roam, exposing them to fights with other animals, getting struck by cars, and other mishaps.

Another contributor to the increased longevity of altered pets involves the reduced risk of certain types of cancers. Unspayed female cats and dogs have a far greater chance of developing pyrometra (a fatal uterine infection), uterine cancer, and other cancers of the reproductive system.

Medical evidence indicates that females spayed before their first heat are typically healthier. (Many veterinarians now sterilize dogs and cats as young as eight weeks of age.)

Male pets who are neutered eliminate their chances of getting testicular cancer, and it is thought they they have lowered rates of prostate cancer, as well.

MYTH: It's better to have one litter before spaying a female pet.

FACT: Every litter counts. Medical evidence indicates just the opposite. In fact, the evidence shows that females spayed before their first heat are typically healthier. Many veterinarians now sterilize dogs and cats as young as eight weeks of age. Check with your veterinarian about the appropriate time for these procedures.
 
MYTH: I want my children to experience the miracle of birth.

FACT: The miracle of birth is quickly overshadowed by the thousands of animals euthanized in animal shelters in communities all across the country. Teach children that all life is precious by spaying and neutering your pets.  
 
MYTH: But my pet is a purebred.

FACT: So is at least one out of every four pets brought to animal shelters around the country. There are just too many dogs and cats—mixed breed and purebred. About half of all animals entering shelters are euthanized.
 
MYTH: I want my dog to be protective.

FACT: It is a dog's natural instinct to protect home and family. A dog's personality is formed more by genetics and environment than by sex hormones. 
 
MYTH: I don't want my male dog or cat to feel like less of a male.

FACT: Pets don't have any concept of sexual identity or ego. Neutering will not change a pet's basic personality. He doesn't suffer any kind of emotional reaction or identity crisis when neutered.      
                                            
MYTH: My pet will get fat and lazy.                                                                                                                                     
FACT: The truth is that most pets get fat and lazy because their owners feed them too much and don't give them enough exercise.
 
MYTH: But my dog (or cat) is so special, I want a puppy (or kitten) just like her.                                                        
FACT: Your pet's puppies or kittens have an unlikely chance of being a carbon copy of your pet. Even professional breeders cannot make this guarantee. There are shelter pets waiting for homes who are just as cute, smart, sweet, and loving as your own. 
 
MYTH: It's expensive to have my pet spayed or neutered.

FACT: Many low-cost options exist for spay/neuter services. Most regions of the U.S. have at least one spay/neuter clinic within driving distance that charge $100 or less for the procedure, and many veterinary clinics provide discounts through subsidized voucher programs. Low-cost spay/neuter is more and more widely available all the time. St Louis has Quick Fix off of Jefferson: http://www.stlspayneuter.org/
 
MYTH: I'll find good homes for all the puppies and kittens.

FACT: You may find homes for your pet's puppies and kittens. But you can only control what decisions you make with your own pet, not the decisions other people make with theirs. Your pet’s puppies and kittens, or their puppies or kittens, could end up in an animal shelter, as one of the many homeless pets in every community competing for a home. Will they be one of the lucky ones?
 

Woof! Randy

You can help by donating to the Stracks Fund so the pups get the care they need. 

To adopt or foster please contact: brittany@strayrescue.org

*Source: HSUS 

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